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Coastal Erosion Funding

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Coastal Erosion Project Funding Sources

Funding may be available for your project. Many local, state, and federal agencies offer funding to community organizations, neighborhood groups, homeowners, and others. Navigating the funding process is not easy. Here are some resources to get you started. When speaking with representatives from one funding source or non-profit organization, make sure to ask for other recommendations and potential funding sources. Network!

Federal Government Grants

NOAA’s Community-Based Restoration Program supports restoration projects that use a habitat-based approach to rebuild productive and sustainable fisheries, contribute to the recovery and conservation of protected resources, promote healthy ecosystems, and yield community and economic benefits. Since 1996, the program has funded more than 1,500 projects to restore coastal habitat.

NOAA’s Coastal Resilience Grants Program is a competitive grant program funds projects that are helping coastal communities and ecosystems prepare for and recover from extreme weather events, climate hazards, and changing ocean conditions.

NOAA‘s Office for Coastal Management has multiple funding opportunities for coastal restoration and resilience.

The National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition’s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) offers the CRP to conserve and improve soil, protect water quality, and provide wildlife habitat by establishing long-term cover on highly erodible land or land in need of conservation buffers that has previously been in row crop production.

US EPA’s Environmental Education Grants Program provides funding to support environmental education projects that promote environmental awareness and stewardship and help provide people with the skills to take responsible actions to protect the environment.

US Fish and Wildlife Service offers many grants for coastal restoration projects.

Green Infrastructure, water quality, stormwater, and flooding funding opportunities.  There are a number of resources available to help communities explore the available funding options for projects. These resources include assistance programs, publications, and financing tools.

Grants.gov is a searchable database of federal grant opportunities. It also provides information on how to apply for grants and the grant-making process.

Call your Congressional Representatives and Senators to ask about federal funding.

State Government Grants & Funding

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has a list of health and environmental agencies in every state. You may find grant opportunities by searching the websites of your state agencies.

Maryland offers financial assistance for shoreline erosion projects through a Water Quality Revolving Loan Fund.

Virginia has established a revolving loan fund, Virginia Shoreline Resiliency Fund, to help homeowners and businesses make changes to their properties in anticipation of sea level rise

Ask your governor’s office about state agency grant funding.

Local Government Grants & Funding

Some local governments have funding programs for community-based environmental projects. They may also have funds for rain gardens, tree planting, community gardens, living shorelines, and other projects to make your property or neighborhood greener.

To find your local, state, or tribal governments, type the following into a search engine: your state/county and then the type of agency you are wanting to connect with (e.g., local government, tribal representative, state government). For example, search for “Alabama beach restoration permitting” or “New Jersey environmental protection.” Also try using terms that relate to your concern or solution. For example, “Florida coastal flooding help.”  Try different terms, or combinations of terms, such as “grants, restoration, invasive species, marsh, natural resources, volunteers, funding, etc.” It may take a few tries to find the site and information you are looking for.

To find a specific local county office, type the following into a search engine: your local county or city and then the department you are wanting to connect with (e.g., environmental, planning, natural resources). For example, search for “Escambia County coastal management” or “Destin FL natural resources.”

You can add “Living Shorelines” to the search terms to find tools, resources and possible funding sources.

In Washington State, you can add “Shore Friendly” or Green Shores” to the search terms.

Conservation Districts work directly with landowners to conserve and promote healthy soils, water, forests, and wildlife.

Foundations and Other Private Sources

The Living Shorelines Group of the Northeast Regional Ocean Council (NROC) facilitates regional knowledge-sharing around living shorelines and coastal green or natural infrastructure.  It is one of two NROC groups engaged in Resilient Shorelines, along with the Marsh Migration Group.

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation administers many other competitive grants to protect and conserve our nation’s fish, wildlife, plants and habitats.

Foundation Directory Online, from the Foundation Center, lists 140,000 foundations and other donors worldwide. Some basic information is free; more requires a subscription. Get access at your local library.

NOZAsearch has a large searchable database of charitable donations. Searches for foundation are free. Individual and corporate philanthropy searches require a subscription. Get access at your local library.

Contact local banks, businesses, and community foundations. Many have money budgeted for community service.

Consider crowdfunding through social media, individual donations from members of your organization, or a special event.

Funding Proposal Resources

Grantspace, a service of Foundation Center, offers in-person and online classes on finding and writing grants, a knowledge base, examples of winning proposals and other documents, and more.

The Grantsmanship Center offers training and resources to help find grants and write effective grant proposals.

Classes. Many community colleges and universities offer classes on grant writing. Check the catalogs and academic schedules for your local schools.

Books. There are many books on grant writing. Check out your local library to see what might be available.

Coastal Erosion Project Resources: